Is it possible to ‘humanise’ a big brand online?

When we talk about people engaging with a customer service channel it is often said that the consumer has interacted with a brand. Of course, the reality is that the customer has engaged with another person – an employee and representative of the brand, but still just another person.

This is easier to imagine with a smaller company. Imagine your local pub has a Facebook page. You know it’s the manager of the pub updating the page and responding to questions in the name of the pub, but how does that apply when you are on the Facebook page of your favourite shampoo brand commenting on their product?

It’s difficult for any brand to scale up the kind of personal service that a small company can offer. In a recent Guardian article it was suggested that blogger Robert Scoble made Microsoft a ‘more human’ brand with his relentless blogging on behalf of the company.

But this was back in 2005 and 2006. It’s a shame The Guardian doesn’t have any more recent examples of individuals who have humanised their brand, in particular by using social media channels in a way that allows individuals to show that they have a voice within the company.

Richard’s blog on the Virgin website is one example I can think of. Sir Richard Branson is a well-known business leader anyway, but his blog doesn’t just promote his companies, it explores how people can become entrepreneurs, and Branson’s own history in business. He even posts some holiday photos now and again giving it a nice personal touch.

Can you think of any better examples of recent company employees who have managed to humanise the brand? Tweet me your ideas on @juliagibbs1

Sir Richard Branson and Virgin America make their Dallas debut

 

Photo by Cynthia Smoot licensed under Creative Commons

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This entry was posted in Current Affairs, Customer Service, Human Resources, Marketing, Social Media and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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