You don’t need to delight, just be effective

Business magazines are full of tips on how companies can delight their customers. This language is used to describe how companies – particularly retailers – can make their customer service experience so good that customers will leave with a smile on their face and a desire to return again to spend more cash.

But the reality isn’t quite like that.

What most customers want when they need to call for help or information is an efficient and competent service. This excellent blog post by Kate Leggett of Forrester addresses this point exactly. Leggett suggests that 77% of consumers (USA) feel that the most important thing any brand can do is to respect their time.

So deal with the problem quickly. Don’t keep people on hold or waiting days for a response. Try to get the response right the first time. These are all the most important factors in trying to offer a great service.

The case studies that talk about customer ‘delight’ are often focused on social media channels. We have all read about the hungry tweeter greeted at airport arrivals with a steak from his favourite restaurant. All these great customer interactions can truly produce delight, but they are not the majority of interactions, in fact they are just a tiny percentage of your customer interactions.

By focusing on pleasing the customer with good information quickly 99% of the time, perhaps your team will have the ability to truly delight the customer 1% of the time. But if you don’t focus on making sure that 99% of service is great then nobody will be delighted at all.

Kathryn blowing bubbles

 

Photo by April Moore-Harris licensed under Creative Commons

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Current Affairs, Customer Service, Social Media and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to You don’t need to delight, just be effective

  1. That is very true – it is hard to delight people if you can’t get the basics right and respect their time. Delivering consistent answers, whatever the channel, should be the start point for any organisation. Effective service has an immediate impact on the bottom line – research found that poor service costs businesses billions every year. More in this Eptica blog post http://eptica.wordpress.com/2014/04/11/116-billion-the-true-cost-of-bad-service/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s